Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
pelosi was talking about wasn't exactly the tax cuts now, fiscal cliff later. both sides have said this has to be a two-step process, there has to be some kind of commitment in downpayment on taxes and entitlement cuts and sets up a framework for broader and comprehensive tax and entitlement reform next year because it is such a big, huge change to how we tax and how we would provide medicare and medicaid and social security, you can't do it all in four books. this new idea that republicans get more leverage if they give the president taxes now and hold out on, and hold the line on the debt ceiling like they did last summer successfully is something that is new and i think a different kind of two-part plan that republicans are starting to consider as maybe a backup plan that gives them the ability to say we lost the 2% tax hikes now, but we're going to fight later on the debt ceiling. >> let me bring in congressman james lang foford, fifth rankin republican in the house, congratulations, good morning. >> thank you, good morning. >> let me ask you about the possibility of some sort
americans use food stamps in august. that cost nearly $72 billion. so when you hear about the fiscal cliff and you hear about possible cuts to entitlements, did this experience change your view of that? >> i would say it changed my view. look i've been someone that wants to support the entire community no matter what neighborhood you live in, no market what your socio-economic background. i was challenged by a local nonprofit to take this challenge to make me a stronger leader and i happily accepted that challenge and it was a good learning experience. it was only a week. it's not the same thing of having to live on food stamps full time. that's brutally difficult to go jool your tummy isn't as full as it needs to be. i get that it was only a week. it helped me be a better policymaker. >> you kept a diary of your experience. i want to read a little bit of your entry from day four. i'm facing a long hungry day and an even longer night getting dinner on the table which requires making everything from scratch on this budget. it's only for a week so i've got a decent attitude. if i were doing
with each leader this morning to talk about the fiscal cliff or slope or curve. but whatever you call it, politico's front page headline reads, fiscal cliff deal emerging. it hashes out the flame woframe agreement including $400 billion in cuts to entitlements. but how close are they really? depends on who you ask. >> what's going on between the decision makers is little to nothing. >> you can actually now see what the contours of the deal look like. >> i'm optimistic that we can continue to work together to overt this crisis and sooner rather than later. >> we will not negotiate the end of medicare. i don't know what it is with these republicans. >> it's safer if you're on the progressive end of the political spectrum to go over the fiscal cliff than it is to agree to some of the things they're talking about. >> ruth, where do you stand, deal or no deal? >> not who deal, but who are more pessimistic. the clock is really ticking. about ten legislative days left in the year. outlines are there but the willingness to do it and the ability to get it done in time, i'm more disappointed than
and it is in fact easier for democrats to go over the fiscal cliff than it is for republicans because then all those tax cuts from the republicans are swept away. but it's too early. it's only december 6. we've got until december 31st and in washington that's a long time. >> a lifetime. you wrote yesterday the republicans are waving a white flag as big as a bed sheet. you wrote "right now bain ser hoping to lead his fractious gop to an orderly surrender. the question is no longer whether republicans will give on taxes, they already have. all that remains to be be negotiated is how they will increase taxes. s so what's the likely scenario as you see it now? >> the fact they have surrendered, saying we're offering up an $800 billion tax increase, that's a big deal but it doesn't save us from the fiscal cliff. as susan was suggesting, there's a long time to go between now and the 31st. they have to wait until that long because neither side wants to appear to be giving in too early. that means they've given away more than they had to. you've got the president out there stirring the pot, trying to bring
the fiscal cliff crisis. they will also meet with john boehner. boehner counter proposal yesterday. $600 billion in cuts in entitlement and $250 billion in changes in way the government changes inflation that would impact social security. let me bring in the national journal from the editor. good morning. i want to talk to you about this republican proposal saying republicans in congress want to get serious about asking the wealthiest to pay slightly higher tax rates. we won't be able to achieve a significant balanced approach to the deficit. it does have some revenue in it, even though it's not from tax increases. so what does this opening offer say about where we are in these negotiations? >> well, it seems very difficult to imagine that we're going to be getting to a deal that will handle everything that needs to be addressed before the end of the year. i think the first main thing that needs to be addressed is the question of the tax cuts expiring. and for the obama administration, the question is, is it in their interest to trade tax cuts for the wealthy? increase for the wealthy fo
's public posture is to say well, no, we don't want to go over the fiscal cliff because you don't want to send that message to the markets. but then behind the scenes you sort of get the feeling they'd be willing to do it and they'd be okay at least temporarily having everything sort of default to that zero position we'd have on january 3rd and then negotiating with the new congress. >> well, the game yesterday, at least, seemed to be who's really serious about fixing the problem. let me play for you what harry reid said. >> he says that democrats have got to get serious about cuts, spending cuts. where's the disconnect, then? >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> there was an opening offer, as you know, molly, from the president. i want to put it up. $1.6 trillion in tax increases, $50 billion in stimulus spending, $400 billion in medicare entitlement savings. again, an opening offer, but, you know, the question republicans are asking is, like, what's really negotiable here? and do you think that joy-ann is right, these are just both sides playing to their b
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)